Are you holding the probe correctly?

Are you holding the probe correctly?
Sometimes we have to get back to our basics and just, make sure we’re holding the probe correctly.  This is especially relevant considering we all have new residents this month (It is July, after all!).  In this podcast, Cian McDermott sits down with Jacob to discuss his tips for how to hold the probe and how to position yourself to get your best images.  Jacob’s favorite tip? Don’t treat the probe like a dirty sock.  Check out the podcast to learn more!
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Comments

  1. Peter Kumasaka : July 22, 2019 at 5:41 pm

    Another of your podcast that goes over what I tell our residents all the time. BASIC, but SOOOO important to perform good POC US.
    But if you look at so many of the texts, articles, etc, WE are doing a horrible job of this. Image after image shows terrible probe grip techniques and ergonomics.

    I often will start out novices by having them write their name several times, where they are not allowed to look at the paper, progressing to not being allowed to touch the paper either and finally where they have to hold the probe like a club and not touch or look at the paper. This highlights the importance of the grip close to the probe face, using their most dextrous fingers (fine control) and “anchoring” their hand to the patient.
    Then while scanning, I will point out how even subtle movements can make a huge difference with the image. Such as a slight tilt, which changes the angle of insonation and voila, the endocardium lights up, or the nerve disappears.

    One last thing that I have come to adopt on occasion is to wrap the cord around my wrist/forearm. I feel that this helps prevent some of the slight movements that the weight of the transducer cord imparts and makes it just a bit easier to stabilize the probe.

    Thanks for all the great podcasts!
    Kuma

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